Small Things

"I live in the moment. Nothing is everything."

Travel only with thy equals or thy betters; if there are none, travel alone.

—The Dhammapada (via unpunk)

(Source: travel-quotes, via unpunk)

kateoplis:

"Mr. McKeever, a lawyer and part-time youth minister at Seventh and James Baptist Church in Waco, had prepared for worse when he committed to wearing the jumpsuit for Lent. After years of providing both spiritual and legal assistance to the poor and formerly incarcerated, it was time to do something more visible to call attention to the nation’s prison crisis, and to the obstacles inmates face on returning to society. But 40 days is a long time to dress like a convict, especially in Texas. “A couple different people said, ‘I hope you don’t get shot!’ ” …
Mr. McKeever, who grew up three hours west in Abilene, has worn prisoner’s clothes while delivering sermons, shopping for groceries, strolling the San Antonio River Walk and taking his daughter to the movies. He has kept a blog reflecting on his experiences (Day 6: “Stares, questioning glances, avoidance”) and on the politics of mass incarceration.
Engaging with those politics is the essence of his Christianity. ‘We follow a condemned criminal!…That’s very much at the heart of our faith. So I try to bring that in.’ …
Among other efforts, he has pushed employers to stop asking about a job applicant’s criminal history — an effort known elsewhere as ‘Ban the Box.’ But as a native Texan, he’s sensitive to tone. ‘I call it a fair-chance hiring policy…It’d be hard even in a conservative place not to get behind something called a fair chance.'”
An Orange jumpsuit for Lent

kateoplis:

"Mr. McKeever, a lawyer and part-time youth minister at Seventh and James Baptist Church in Waco, had prepared for worse when he committed to wearing the jumpsuit for Lent. After years of providing both spiritual and legal assistance to the poor and formerly incarcerated, it was time to do something more visible to call attention to the nation’s prison crisis, and to the obstacles inmates face on returning to society. But 40 days is a long time to dress like a convict, especially in Texas. “A couple different people said, ‘I hope you don’t get shot!’ ” …

Mr. McKeever, who grew up three hours west in Abilene, has worn prisoner’s clothes while delivering sermons, shopping for groceries, strolling the San Antonio River Walk and taking his daughter to the movies. He has kept a blog reflecting on his experiences (Day 6: “Stares, questioning glances, avoidance”) and on the politics of mass incarceration.

Engaging with those politics is the essence of his Christianity. ‘We follow a condemned criminal!…That’s very much at the heart of our faith. So I try to bring that in.’ …

Among other efforts, he has pushed employers to stop asking about a job applicant’s criminal history — an effort known elsewhere as ‘Ban the Box.’ But as a native Texan, he’s sensitive to tone. ‘I call it a fair-chance hiring policy…It’d be hard even in a conservative place not to get behind something called a fair chance.'”

An Orange jumpsuit for Lent

I don’t think love is always a huge, cataclysmal emotional event. I think sometimes it sits in front of you for a very long time until you glance over and say, oh, there you are. I don’t think it’s your saving grace. I think it’s the hand that you hold while you save yourself. I don’t think it’s someone who sweeps you off your feet. I think it’s someone who stays right beside you and lets you walk on your own. I don’t think it’s always a blazing but temporary insanity of racing hearts and hormones. I think that’s the love that changes us. The love that should stay with us is the calm, deep, thorough knowing that you want to be with someone despite logical objections. And what may be even more important than anything is that I think you find your own love at the very edges of where other people’s love pushes you.

—(via theperksofbeingtiffany)

Ooh dang that last sentence…

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

Of course, you never really forget anyone, but you certainly release them. You stop allowing their history to have any meaning for you today. You let them change their haircut, let them move, let them fall in love again. And when you see this person you have let go, you realize that there is no reason to be sad. The person you knew exists somewhere, but you are separated by too much time to reach them again.

But I tell you
the clear sunshiny
days are here, at last.

—Raymond Carver, from “Soda Crackers” (via the-final-sentence)

(via aesthetease)

ari-abroad:

I figured the pink dots were artistic protest. But Kiev reporter Maxim Eristavi tells me it’s to mark structural instability. via Instagram http://ift.tt/1i4U4Ma

ari-abroad:

I figured the pink dots were artistic protest. But Kiev reporter Maxim Eristavi tells me it’s to mark structural instability. via Instagram http://ift.tt/1i4U4Ma

I remember one morning getting up at dawn, there was such a sense of possibility. You know, that feeling? And I remember thinking to myself: So, this is the beginning of happiness. This is where it starts. And of course there will always be more. It never occurred to me it wasn’t the beginning. It was happiness. It was the moment. Right then.

—Clarissa Vaughan, The Hours (2002)

(Source: anuclearmystic, via aesthetease)

THE NECESSITY OF APPEARING
IN YOUR OWN FACE

There are days when that is the last place
in the world where you want to be but you
have to be there, like a movie, because it
features you.

—Richard Brautigan (via waxenneat)

(via waxenneat)