Small Things

"I live in the moment. Nothing is everything."
parabola-magazine:

The Middle GroundThere is a middle ground, a basic Reality embracing selfand Self. It may be called my true nature. To discover whatprevents me from the experience of it, I have only to lookat myself, just as I am.It is so simple.At this moment, what is my state?I let my attention embrace the whole of myself, from thetop of the head through the torso, solar plexus, the entirestructure.I am very still in the body. I follow the breath. I watchthe movements of thoughts and associations. The feelingsbecome quiet, and the activity in the head diminishes. I am more. I perceive the whole of my world, just as it is.I remain very still, refusing the mind’s inclinations to reachfor anything.Thoughts and feelings come and go like floating clouds.They are not me.The experience is at one and the same time, both activeand passive. Through sensation of the body, I perceive thatI am. Yet, I do not know who or what I am. I am witness tomy existence.I am aware of a feeling which suffuses the interior of myself.It is a choiceless, an accepting awareness. With it comes asensation that extends to and envelopes all the parts of the body. I am very still, relating to the silence that is both inside and outside.Nothing is lacking at this moment.–William Segal (1904-2000), painter and writer, met P.D. Ouspensky and G.I. Gurdjieff in the 1940s, and later spent long periods at the main Rinzai and Soto Zen monasteries in Japan. He is the author of numerous works, including Openings: Collected Writings of William Segal (1985-1997). This poem is from The Middle Ground, (Green River Press). From Parabola Magazine, Winter 2006, the “Home” issue. Purchase it here.Subscribe here.Photography Credit: A portarait of William Segal from the autobiography of William Segal, entitled A Voice at the Borders of Silence, edited by Mark Magill. (The Overlook Press, New York, 2003), p. 234.

parabola-magazine:

The Middle Ground

There is a middle ground, a basic Reality embracing self
and Self. It may be called my true nature. To discover what
prevents me from the experience of it, I have only to look
at myself, just as I am.

It is so simple.
At this moment, what is my state?

I let my attention embrace the whole of myself, from the
top of the head through the torso, solar plexus, the entire
structure.

I am very still in the body. I follow the breath. I watch
the movements of thoughts and associations. The feelings
become quiet, and the activity in the head diminishes. I 
am more. I perceive the whole of my world, just as it is.

I remain very still, refusing the mind’s inclinations to reach
for anything.

Thoughts and feelings come and go like floating clouds.
They are not me.

The experience is at one and the same time, both active
and passive. Through sensation of the body, I perceive that
I am. Yet, I do not know who or what I am. I am witness to
my existence.

I am aware of a feeling which suffuses the interior of myself.
It is a choiceless, an accepting awareness. With it comes a
sensation that extends to and envelopes all the parts of the 
body. I am very still, relating to the silence that is both 
inside and outside.

Nothing is lacking at this moment.

William Segal (1904-2000), painter and writer, met P.D. Ouspensky and G.I. Gurdjieff in the 1940s, and later spent long periods at the main Rinzai and Soto Zen monasteries in Japan. He is the author of numerous works, including Openings: Collected Writings of William Segal (1985-1997). This poem is from The Middle Ground, (Green River Press). 

From Parabola Magazine, Winter 2006, the “Home” issue. Purchase it here.

Subscribe here.

Photography Credit: A portarait of William Segal from the autobiography of William Segal, entitled A Voice at the Borders of Silence, edited by Mark Magill. (The Overlook Press, New York, 2003), p. 234.

(via crashinglybeautiful)

The true magic of this broken world lay in the ability of the things it contained to vanish, to become so thoroughly lost, that they might never have existed in the first place.

—Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

Travel changes you. As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life - and travel - leaves marks on you. Most of the time, those marks - on your body or on your heart - are beautiful. Often, though, they hurt.

—Anthony Bourdain (via waxenneat)

etoilesduballet:

Life inside the Bolshoi Theatre:photographs by Olya Ivanova for the Telegraph and American Airlines

More here, she takes beautiful photos so go check them out!!

(via wiliqueen)

Woke up this morning with
a terrific urge to lie in bed all day
and read. Fought against it for a minute.

Then looked out the window at the rain.
And gave over. Put myself entirely
in the keep of this rainy morning.

Would I live my life over again?
Make the same unforgiveable mistakes?
Yes, given half a chance. Yes.

—Raymond Carver, “Rain” (via larmoyante)

(Source: larmoyante, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

waxenneat:

A rainy Pacific Northwest day with arbutus trees, tiny islands, caffeine boosts, and a friend to join me in exploring.

etrangere:

yes there are seriously two #sleeping #bees #snuggling on this #sunflower.

etrangere:

yes there are seriously two #sleeping #bees #snuggling on this #sunflower.

Things I Learned In The Summer of 2k14

thefrenemy:

Scalp sunburn really hurts. Moisturize your neck. Give your nails a break sometimes and keep them bare. Be bare. Invest in a million different bras, including racerback and sport and ones with small straps and strapless one, too. Go braless. Take more napkins. Even more napkins than that. More….